The Octopus's Garden

We would be warm below the storm
In our little hideaway beneath the waves

Some people go to the symphony to hear the masters. I go to hear the Pee Wee theme performed live. #iknowyouarebutwhatami?

The crows that live in Tokyo use clothes hangers to make nests. In such a large city, there are few trees, so the natural materials that crows need to make their nests are scarce. As a result, the crows occasionally take hangers from the people who live in apartments nearby, and carefully assemble them into nests. The completed nests almost look like works of art based on the theme of recycling.
(photo by Yosuke Kashiwakura via National Geographic Photo Contest) View high resolution

The crows that live in Tokyo use clothes hangers to make nests. In such a large city, there are few trees, so the natural materials that crows need to make their nests are scarce. As a result, the crows occasionally take hangers from the people who live in apartments nearby, and carefully assemble them into nests. The completed nests almost look like works of art based on the theme of recycling.

(photo by Yosuke Kashiwakura via National Geographic Photo Contest)

Sign I’m getting old and live with a computer scientist: this video was the most fun I’ve had all week.

justamus:

A rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.
Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.
View high resolution

justamus:

A rare vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.

Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class.

(via hellotailor)

Here’s looking at a crazy busy week.
natgeofound:

Two women gaze at heavy surf while lying on boulders on the coast of Nova Scotia, December 1961.Photograph by Volkmar Wentzel, National Geographic
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Here’s looking at a crazy busy week.

natgeofound:

Two women gaze at heavy surf while lying on boulders on the coast of Nova Scotia, December 1961.Photograph by Volkmar Wentzel, National Geographic

Autumn sunshine is nice, but I miss Vancouver’s fog.

The oldest known octopus fossil belongs to an animal that lived some 296 million years ago, during the Carboniferous period. That specimen belongs to a species named Pohlsepia and is on display at the Field Museum in Chicago. Harmon Courage describes it as a “flattened cow patty” or a “globular splat,” but a close examination reveals the tell-tale eight arms and two eyes. Researchers aren’t sure, but possibly there’s an ink sack there, too. In other words, long before life on land had progressed beyond puny pre-dinosaur reptiles, octopuses had already established their shape for the millions of years to come.

The Good Life

I have made up my mind now to be a sailor’s wife,
To have a purse full of money and a very easy life,
For a clever sailor husband is so seldom at his home,
That his wife can spend the dollars with a will that’s all her own,
Then I’ll haste to wed a sailor, and send him off to sea,
For a life of independence is the pleasant life for me,
But every now and then I shall like to see his face,
For it always seems to me to beam with manly grace,
With his brow so nobly open, and his dark and kindly eye,
Oh my heart beats fondly toward him whenever he is nigh,
But when he says, “Goodbye, my love, I’m off across the sea,”
First I cry for his departure, then laugh because I’m free,
Yet I’ll welcome him most gladly, whenever he returns
And share with him so cheerfully all the money that he earns
For he’s a loving husband, though he leads a roving life
And well I know how good it is to be a sailor’s wife.

(via the hairpin)

Cozy.
(these found National Geographic photos are ridiculously good)
natgeofound:

A shelter made of antlers at Yellowstone National Park.Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic
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Cozy.

(these found National Geographic photos are ridiculously good)

natgeofound:

A shelter made of antlers at Yellowstone National Park.
Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic

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